Energy Internet and eVehicles Overview

Governments around the world are wrestling with the challenge of how to prepare society for inevitable climate change. To date most people have been focused on how to reduce Green House Gas emissions, but now there is growing recognition that regardless of what we do to mitigate against climate change the planet is going to be significantly warmer in the coming years with all the attendant problems of more frequent droughts, flooding, sever storms, etc. As such we need to invest in solutions that provide a more robust and resilient infrastructure to withstand this environmental onslaught especially for our electrical and telecommunications systems.

Linking renewable energy with high speed Internet using fiber to the home combined with eVehicles and dynamic charging where vehicle's batteries are charged as it travels along the road, may provide for a whole new "energy Internet" infrastructure for linking small distributed renewable energy sources to users that is far more robust and resilient to survive climate change than today's centralized command and control infrastructure. For more details please see:

Using eVehicles for Renewable Energy Transportation and Distribution: and

Free High Speed Internet to the Home or School Integrated with solar roof top:

High level architecture of Internet Networks to survive Climate Change:

Architecture and routing protocols for Energy Internet

Monday, January 28, 2013

Recharge Your Electric Car Through Its Tires for Mobile Charging

Given the shortcomings of vehicle batteries–their high cost, the time it takes to recharge them, and the fact that they store less energy as they age (they’re expected to lose about 20 percent over 8 years)–many researchers are looking for alternative ways to power electric cars.

Powering them from overhead lines, the way many city buses get power now, doesn’t seem practical. But some researchers are suggesting embedding wireless power transmitters into roads that could top off a battery as a car drives over them. This would make it practical to use smaller, cheaper batteries that could be replaced every few years.

Normally, such systems would require bolting a power receiver to the bottom of a car. Now researchers at Toyohashi University of Technology have demonstrated that power can be transferred from electrodes buried in a road to the steel belts inside tires. That power was used to propel a scale model of an electric vehicle (according to Green Car Congress). The researchers say the energy transfer is as efficient as charging and discharging a lithium ion battery.

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